Random Quote # 27

This, then is what we call arbitrary coherence. Initial prices are largely “arbitrary” and can be influenced by responses to random questions; but once those prices are established in our minds, they shape not only what we are willing to pay for an item, but also how much we are willing to pay for related products (this makes them coherent).

D. Ariely, The Irrational Bundle: Predictably Irrational, The Upside of Irrationality, and The Honest Truth about Dishonesty

Random Quote #26

“That’s a lesson we can all learn: the more we have, the more we want. And the only cure is to break the cycle of relativity.”

D. Ariely, The Irrational Bundle: Predictably Irrational, The Upside of Irrationality, and The Honest Truth about Dishonesty

Random Quote #17

“The goals that people set for themselves are so important to what they do and how they feel about it that an exclusive focus on experienced well-being is not tenable. We cannot hold a concept of well-being that ignores what people want. On the other hand, it is also true that a concept of well-being that ignores how people feel as they live and focuses only on how they feel when they think about their life is also untenable.”

D. Kahneman, in Thinking, Fast and Slow

Random Quote #16

“a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in.”

D. Kahneman, in Thinking, Fast and Slow

Random Quote #15

“Overconfidence is fed by the illusory certainty of hindsight.”

D. Kahneman

Random Quote #14

“People tend to assess the relative importance of issues by the ease with which they are retrieved from memory – and this is largely determined by the extent of coverage in the media. Frequently mentioned topics populate the mind even as others slip away from awareness.”

D. Kahneman, in Thinking, Fast and Slow

Random Quote #7

“In other words, flow is a state of arousal, but it is accompanied not by the shallow respiration characteristic of mental effort but rather by the deep respiration typical of joyous states. This is compatible with our proposal that the flow state is the result of an interaction between positive affect and attention.”

in B. Bruya (ed.) Effortless attention: a new perspective in the cognitive science of attention and action.